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Thoughts??? Anonymous 117432

Mrs. Bailey. She was a tallish woman, with reddish, untidy, scanty hair, and when she opened her mouth you saw that two of her front teeth were missing. One of her ears was partly torn off by her husband, and there was a scar on her forehead which was the result of a cut when once he had thrown her out of a window. He was a big, strong, brutal fellow who had been badly wounded in the war, and Mrs. Bailey forgave him his violence because he was often in great pain. They had four children and they all went in terror of him. But Mrs. Bailey had a strong sense of humour, the real Cockney humour, and when she wasn’t in fear of her life was full of fun. She loved a good laugh. At last Bailey died. I went to see her after his death and she said to me: “He wasn’t a bad man really. D’you know what he said to me? They was almost his last words. ‘I’ve given you hell, haven’t I? You’ll be glad to be rid of me.’ ‘No, I won’t, Ned,’ I said to him, ‘you know I’ve always loved you.’ He gave me a funny look, and d’you know what he said? ‘You old cow,’ he said. That shows he loved me really, doesn’t it?—calling me an old cow like that, I mean.”

Anonymous 117435

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Anonymous 117437

Another pickme making excuses for putting her children through hell.

Anonymous 117442

Is this from infinite jest? God I swear I'll get around to reading it next year.

Anonymous 117454

>>117442
Somerset Maugham's A Writer's Notebook, actually

Anonymous 117513

>>117437
Well, if the children were male, I don't think it's as bad.
It's moids suffering at the hand of a fellow moid.
From my dating experience, I find that men who had fathers as children are more empathetic to women, and more conscious of toxic masculinity in general.
So there's a net gain in moids inflicting suffering on other moids, it sort of opens their minds a little.

Maybe child custody laws should be reconsidered so that male children always go to the father even if he's a violent scumbag. It would improve society somewhat.

Anonymous 117514

>>117513
>I find that men who had fathers as children
* abusive fathers as children

But then again, this correction seems superfluous since almost all fathers are abusive to their children in one way or another.

Anonymous 118381

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>>117510

Anonymous 118385

>>117442
It's not, but it definitely touches on similar themes as something you might find in IJ. Just pick it up when it feels right, don't let the number of pages feel daunting.

>>117437
There's so many ways to interpret this passage, but I feel like you've glossed over them all to arrive at a very cynical, dead-end interpretation. In some ways, he's calling her an old cow because he desperately wanted her to say something harmful to him on his death bed, as if to make him even for the years of abuse he gave her. When she denied him this, it was almost like she was sending him to hell; he could not possibly redeem himself, hence, "You old cow". In other ways, it really can be seen as a term of endearment, my parents say stuff like that to each other a lot, my mum calls my dad an old bastard all the time in a loving way, it's definitely more a British/Australian thing than an American thing. Then there's also the idea that he really meant to call her an old cow, and she thinks he loves her by saying this. It's as if, even when given the opportunity to be good, he still chooses to be a bastard; she thinks he's doing this so that she doesn't feel guilt when he dies, in reality he really does just think she's an old cow. It's definitely an interesting way to bring to light the types of mentalities you might find in victims of abuse, as if they'll go through all types of mental loops to maintain their belief that a person is good. It's deeply sad, told with enough irony to make it palatable. Humour helps us process the absurd.



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